Horstback Riding Hastings

First Aid Kits for Horse Trailers and Barns

Sharon Dreifus, DVM, recently spoke to the Saddle Sisters Rider’s Club about Emergency Kits for the barn and horse trailer. I have been hauling for about four years and do not even have a Band-Aid in my trailer. So I found this to be a very comprehensive and informative discussion. The three most important items to have in your Emergency Kit include: an extra halter with lead rope, a flashlight with extra batteries and a humane twitch, if it is appropriate for your horse. The twitch helps release endorphins for about 10 minutes. Also remember to pack a hoof pick, thermometer, towel, antibacterial...

Read more...

Mindy Price of Mon Cheval Training Center at CHC

Mindy Price of Mon Cheval Training Center offers dressage riding instruction and training from Training Level through FEI. She welcomes both young and experienced horses and riders. Price has earned a USDF Bronze and Silver medal and many national, regional and state championships at all levels of dressage and offers more than 25 years of training experience. Additionally she has coached several students to their bronze medal and her assistant trainer Ginger Coleman to her silver. Price utilizes classical methods that adhere to the training scale and take care to work each horses' individual...

Read more...

AquaPacer and Hally Make Winning Combination

When BMQ Hally Berry, a 4-year-old AQHA, caught her leg in a fence this past summer, she required 30 stitches on her hind left hock and had to be on stall rest for 6 weeks. Her leg had to be completely immobilized and the bandage changed daily for the first 4 weeks. It was a lot of work for her owner Rachel Lueth, who began the slow rehabilitation process with Hally. She started with hand walking, lunging and eventually riding her after two months. Lueth’s chiropractor, Alana Altnow, saw Hally recovering slowly and was concerned about her range of motion.  Altnow had heard somewhere in Hastings...

Read more...

Remember the Hot Summer?

Living in Minnesota is not for the light hearted, especially with our weather. It can change more than 40 degrees in one day.  I have heard a lot of complaining recently with the cold spells we have been enduring, and I reflected back on our hot summer.  Interestingly enough a lot of the same principles for taking care of your horse in extreme weather apply: lots of water, electrolytes and to be careful when riding or trailering.  So here is a reminder from my August 18 posting on how to beat the heat. With the recent dangerously high temperatures it might be useful to republish two very helpful...

Read more...

Embrace Winter Horseback Riding

Winter has finally hit Minnesota. It is very important that you keep warm and safe during winter riding. I found several articles on this topic and am including a few.  I highly recommend you read these before riding during these dangerously cold temperatures.  Please remember I am not a veterinarian or horse professional, simply a recreational rider and one that prefers to stay warm. http://voices.yahoo.com/10-tips-horseback-riding-safely-winter-5469945.html http://bangordailynews.com/2011/11/18/outdoors/winter-horseback-riding-can-be-fun-but-special-care-is-needed/ http://horses.about.com/od/seasonalcare/qt/winteridingtips.htm As...

Read more...

Blanketing Your Horse

Deciding to blanket your horse can be a big decision and usually needs to be decided before the onset of winter on a horse by horse basis.  For the past few winters I have not blanketed my horse on a regular basis as he is a draft cross with a heavy winter coat and my thinking was that mother nature gave him enough protection.  With my previous horse, a Thoroughbred, I chose to blanket him as mother nature did not seem so generous. Many articles have been written on horse blanketing and I encourage you to do your own research before making your decision but hopefully my experiences will be helpful....

Read more...

Beat the Heat!

With the recent dangerously high temperatures it might be useful to republish two very helpful articles and obtain some tips for heat stress.   Overall heat stress can occur when the temperature plus humidity is equal or greater than 140, the humidity is over 75 percent or the heat index is over 96 percent. "Be very careful trailering or riding horses in this weather.  Make sure horses have a lot of water, shade and electrolytes,”  advises Julie Stenslie of Wildwood Farm. According to Heat Stress in Horses by Kentucky Equine Research staff published March 3, 2011;  “Horses dissipate...

Read more...

Mother Daughter Trail Ride

Most of my life I have been an arena princess but I recently became a trail blazer and decided that one of my goals was to  go trail riding with my eleven-year-old daughter.   Last year for her first trail ride I lead her on the horse.  The next time we participated in a mom daughter trail ride.  The barn moms took the horses out on a short trail ride while leaving the kids at the trail head.  Then we came back and gave the horses to the daughters to go on the same short trail.  Finally a few weeks ago I borrowed a friends Arabian horse and Gabi and I hit the trails alone. The day started...

Read more...

Relief with Liniment

Fortunately there are many choices when it comes to liniments: gels, sprays, cream and oil just to mention a few.  Which one is best for you and your horse?  That will depend on you and sometimes your veterinarian.  Personally I have used a ready mixed liniment diluted with water to cool my horse in the summer.  I fill a small bathing bucket with cold water and add about ¼ cup of liniment.  I apply it with a large sponge and then use a horse squeegee to scrape off the remaining moisture.  Another convenient option is to take the concentrate and put it in a spray bottle and dilute with water....

Read more...

Offensive and Defensive Riding

Recently I was asked for advice by a first-time horse buyer regarding purchasing her first horse.  I immediately thought of my first horse Rudy, and while he was wonderful he unfortunately had a large “go” button and I became a very defensive rider.  Of course I did not realize this until years later while taking a lesson and the instructor explained I was bracing.  Now maybe my first horse had nothing to do with this and I just was a defensive rider that felt comfortable bracing on a horse.  But had I had a calmer horse like I currently ride, I might have become a more confident and offensive...

Read more...