Horse Care

Track Your Horse’s Weight this New Year

Some of the most popular New Year's Resolutions include losing weight, getting fit, saving money and eating healthful foods. I have found that horseback riding can meet all of the above resolutions. I seem to burn a lot of calories while riding and doing barn chores, thus helping me lose weight and stay fit. I save money since I am at the barn instead of the mall; I usually get hungry after riding, so I snack on my horse’s carrots and apples, resulting in eating healthful foods. It seems of all the New Year’s resolutions, losing weight is the most popular; barn chores and riding are effective...

Read more...

Horse MRI— A Positive Experience by Lynne Pernsteiner

It started with lameness When our young Quarter horse "Fancy" came up lame, we consulted with our equine veterinarian  She performed an extensive lameness exam, including a physical work-up, a radiograph and an ultra-sound imaging of Fancy’s front leg. Unfortunately, nothing was found so we decided to try “resting” our horse—which is not as easy as it sounds! Several months passed without a sign of improvement so we called our vet back for more testing. This time she tried blocking nerves to pinpoint the troubled area and discovered that the injury was low in the fetlock. During...

Read more...

Equine Dentistry: Teeth Floating Explained by Julie Laueux-Parks, DVM

The question of why we worry about horse's teeth is answered by looking at their lifestyle. Horses will forage for 16-20 hours a day to get their daily nutrients and keep their GI tract functioning normally. The average horse needs about 20 pounds of hay each day and all that forage needs to be ground down before it reaches the stomach. This is the primary job of the teeth. In addition, we ask them to perform as athletes: to bend, collect, turn, spin, run and slide. All of these skills require horses to slide their jaws, put pressure on their cheeks, tongue and palate. Improperly aligned teeth...

Read more...

BEAT THE HEAT! Cooling Relief with Liniment

There are many choices when it comes to liniments: gels, sprays, creams and oils, just to mention a few.  Which one is best for you and your horse?  That will depend on you, and sometimes your veterinarian.  I reached out and asked your favorite products and recipes and am sharing them with you. “I work at a tack store and the most popular is Bigeloil. People use it on themselves and horses. It’s also been around for many years.  A lot of the old-timers say it works wonders.” "My favorite recipe is to mix up in equal parts: original brown color Listerine, witch hazel, and rubbing...

Read more...

Flies, Flies Go Away and Don’t Come Back Another Day!

Summer welcomes many things: wonderful weather, beautiful lakes and sunsets, riding outdoors, and insects, including flies and ticks.  I reached out to find some fly repellent tips and tricks and thought I would share them.   "Skin-So-Soft works great to keep gnats out of their ears and hair lines as well as an ingredient for home-made fly spray." "Putting a small amount of garlic powder in your horse's feed helps reduce ticks.  A recipe I use is one 32 oz. bottle of Apple Cider Vinegar, one tablespoon dawn dish soap, one tablespoon garlic powder and one gallon of water.   Mix ingredients...

Read more...

AquaPacer and Hally Make Winning Combination

When BMQ Hally Berry, a 4-year-old AQHA, caught her leg in a fence this past summer, she required 30 stitches on her hind left hock and had to be on stall rest for 6 weeks. Her leg had to be completely immobilized and the bandage changed daily for the first 4 weeks. It was a lot of work for her owner Rachel Lueth, who began the slow rehabilitation process with Hally. She started with hand walking, lunging and eventually riding her after two months. Lueth’s chiropractor, Alana Altnow, saw Hally recovering slowly and was concerned about her range of motion.  Altnow had heard somewhere in Hastings...

Read more...

Blanketing Your Horse

Deciding to blanket your horse can be a big decision and usually needs to be decided before the onset of winter on a horse by horse basis.  For the past few winters I have not blanketed my horse on a regular basis as he is a draft cross with a heavy winter coat and my thinking was that mother nature gave him enough protection.  With my previous horse, a Thoroughbred, I chose to blanket him as mother nature did not seem so generous. Many articles have been written on horse blanketing and I encourage you to do your own research before making your decision but hopefully my experiences will be helpful....

Read more...

Body Clipping Your Horse

With the onset of winter and having recently moving to a heated facility, I started thinking about body clipping my horse.  I was advised to consider several factors before deciding to clip him such as: how much am I working him, does he live inside or out, is the barn heated, are blankets taken on and off, how much time do I spend cooling him out? Horses that stay in stalls overnight generally can have more clipped than horses that live outside 24/7. "There are different types of clips available: full clip, hunter clip, trace clip, hunter/chase clip, Irish Clip, Blanket clip and Bib clip, just...

Read more...

Beat the Heat!

With the recent dangerously high temperatures it might be useful to republish two very helpful articles and obtain some tips for heat stress.   Overall heat stress can occur when the temperature plus humidity is equal or greater than 140, the humidity is over 75 percent or the heat index is over 96 percent. "Be very careful trailering or riding horses in this weather.  Make sure horses have a lot of water, shade and electrolytes,”  advises Julie Stenslie of Wildwood Farm. According to Heat Stress in Horses by Kentucky Equine Research staff published March 3, 2011;  “Horses dissipate...

Read more...

Relief with Liniment

Fortunately there are many choices when it comes to liniments: gels, sprays, cream and oil just to mention a few.  Which one is best for you and your horse?  That will depend on you and sometimes your veterinarian.  Personally I have used a ready mixed liniment diluted with water to cool my horse in the summer.  I fill a small bathing bucket with cold water and add about ¼ cup of liniment.  I apply it with a large sponge and then use a horse squeegee to scrape off the remaining moisture.  Another convenient option is to take the concentrate and put it in a spray bottle and dilute with water....

Read more...